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Thread: Record Cleaning

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    Default Record Cleaning

    I've read somewhere that once you play a record "wet" you must always play it "wet". I'm sure I read it in HFN years ago. Anyone else know anything about this?
    Si.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chops54 View Post
    I've read somewhere that once you play a record "wet" you must always play it "wet". I'm sure I read it in HFN years ago. Anyone else know anything about this?
    I've heard that too, but I don't know the reasoning behind it. Something to do with 'vinyl memory' maybe? I imagine there would be a fair bit of heat at the contact point, but I would assume that playing a record wet would lubricate the stylus tip which would have less of an effect on the vinyl. Beats me...

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrAwfulsounds View Post


    So I picked a fairly clean record, got a hairspray bottle, sprayed the record with just a fine mist (demineralised water cos I am a fusspot) and played one side through.

    After that I kid you not - one gentle wipe with a soft brush removed all the crud in one go. Go figure.
    I am no scientist but could the water mist have simply allowed the static to discharge more easily (although I cant get my head around where it discharges too) allowing the easy removal of the resulting crud?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy831 View Post
    I am no scientist but could the water mist have simply allowed the static to discharge more easily (although I cant get my head around where it discharges too) allowing the easy removal of the resulting crud?
    That was the result I was hoping for, and it seemed to work, but I don't have a science degree either so my theory may be just hogwash. Maybe a wet ball of crud is more easily removed than dry? All I can say is what I initially saw under the microscope, ie, little fibres of dust standing up like soldiers, definitely showed signs of electrostatic behaviour.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chops54 View Post
    I've read somewhere that once you play a record "wet" you must always play it "wet". I'm sure I read it in HFN years ago. Anyone else know anything about this?
    I seem to remember seeing this as well, I also remember seeing an addition to your TT that looked like a plastic armtube that contained, presumably, distilled water, feeding a small plush roller, Similer to a dustbug, with the distilled water to wet clean as you played a disk.
    Coincidences - Gods way of reminding you that he's here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chops54 View Post
    I've read somewhere that once you play a record "wet" you must always play it "wet". I'm sure I read it in HFN years ago. Anyone else know anything about this?
    I am well interested. Anyone up for further discussion on this?

    And while on the subject - I ran out of demineralised water recently and made the mistake of cleaning a batch of records using tap water. Never again. Left white spots on the records which were nigh on impossible to remove.

    I suspect the ideal cleaning solution would be a 4:1 mix of distilled water and isopropal, with maybe 1 or 2 ppm detergent as a wetting agent. No science degree, but chemistry 101 says detergents bond with hydrocarbons, so I'm very reluctant to use any more than the tiniest drop.

    Not being able to afford, much less procure large volumes of isopropal around these parts, (I tried once and got funny looks from the girl at the chemist,) I've found meths works quite well when diluted in a similar proportion. I generally go for no name or 'earth choice' detergent which has very few additives. I used to apply the solution with a shaving brush, but nowadays have a nifty little trough and a record clamp to spin them around. Then I allow them to air dry. Works a treat!

    Anyway, I guess the point I was trying to make is never, never, ever, ever use tap water to clean records. Although you probably knew that already. Just thought I'd share.
    Last edited by MrAwfulsounds; 10th June 2010 at 08:15. Reason: *sp

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    Do you live in a hard water area then? The tap water here would probably be ok to use, it's very soft - comes from Wales (the country, not the big fishes).

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrAwfulsounds View Post
    I am well interested. Anyone up for further discussion on this?
    made the mistake of cleaning a batch of records using tap water. Never again. Left white spots on the records which were nigh on impossible to remove.
    Anyway, I guess the point I was trying to make is never, never, ever, ever use tap water to clean records. Although you probably knew that already. Just thought I'd share.
    Like TIU says, it'll depend on the type and quality of your tap water. I've posted a whole routine previously for cleaning records records (without an RCM) using tap water and SOAP (an extract from a hi fi mag many many years ago). It is imperitive that you use soap and not detergent as it is the detergent that normally leaves a residue. I used this method quite successfully for years before getting a proper RCM and as the water is very soft in my region (central Scotland), I never had any problems. Look here.
    Posts on Record cleaning should probably go over to "Vinyl", as this is j7s neck of the woods and started off as stylus cleaning.
    Last edited by WullieD20; 10th June 2010 at 12:25. Reason: Comment & link
    You can only be young once, but you can be immature for ever.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by WullieD20 View Post
    Posts on Record cleaning should probably go over to "Vinyl", as this is j7s neck of the woods and started off as stylus cleaning.
    Clean record = clean stylus
    Si.

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    I started this thread to discuss this broad subject and have moved a few threads over from the trade forum so as not to clutter that with off topic chat. But how I get this post to the top of this thread is beyond me. Kenny?
    Last edited by TIU; 10th June 2010 at 17:45.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TIU View Post
    I started this thread to discuss this broad subject and have moved a few threads over from the trade forum so as not to clutter that with off topic chat. But how I get this post to the top of this thread is beyond me. Kenny?
    Skapegoat

    The point was electrostatic charge. The cartridge in question was a Dynavector 10x5, and this cart is STILL a nuisance for attracting dirt. I find the dirt just sticks to it, and the only way I've found to clean it is by playing a wet record.

    Didn't mean to waffle on about record cleaning. Sorry guys.

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    Scapegoat? In what context exactly/roughly?

    "A person who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others, esp. for reasons of expediency."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chops54 View Post
    I've read somewhere that once you play a record "wet" you must always play it "wet".
    That's right, I remember it too. I did try it but I'm not convinced by the idea.

    Firstly, it's not very controllable. The water will dry off, how do you know how wet it is, and water plus dust equals mud! Then there is the effect of the damp record on the sleeves. My music room has damp corners and I've got mould on some records. Records being damp for a long time is not that great an idea I don't think. A fad idea that rightly didn't catch on.

    I made the mistake of cleaning a batch of records using tap water
    Yes, totally dependant on where you live. In Scotland the water is very soft and you can use it to clean records no problem. I've tried both tap and distilled water and could detect do difference. we get no scale in the kettle, no white marks on the car if you hose it off, nothing.
    I just happen to think your opinion is a general sweeping statement of wrongness

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    Quote Originally Posted by TIU View Post
    Scapegoat? In what context exactly/roughly?

    "A person who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others, esp. for reasons of expediency."
    ummm yeah. perhaps what I should have said was "guilty as charged."

    all in good humour guys, carry on...

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    No worries Mr AS. What's your first name btw?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TIU View Post
    No worries Mr AS. What's your first name btw?
    I'm Sean

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    Sean the system you are describing was the Lencoclean system. You were right when you said that once played wet we must continue to play wet. The Lencoclean fluid was a mixture of alchohol and distilled water and a little wetting agent.
    It was claimed to get rid of surface noise...............nowt else! It did this well, but at a cost!
    If the fluid delivery tube was not set quite right it flooded the lp so the stylus was effectively under the surface. As a result I had quite a few carts that lost their tips or cantilevers. I wrecked quite a few very very good carts using this fluid.
    The ONLY way to remove the sludge is to wet clean the vinyl quite a few times untill it is all removed.
    Of course the cleaning agent has to have alchohol in it or it wont remove the resulting chemical sludge.
    S

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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartwen View Post
    Sean the system you are describing was the Lencoclean system. You were right when you said that once played wet we must continue to play wet. The Lencoclean fluid was a mixture of alchohol and distilled water and a little wetting agent.
    It was claimed to get rid of surface noise...............nowt else! It did this well, but at a cost!
    If the fluid delivery tube was not set quite right it flooded the lp so the stylus was effectively under the surface. As a result I had quite a few carts that lost their tips or cantilevers. I wrecked quite a few very very good carts using this fluid.
    The ONLY way to remove the sludge is to wet clean the vinyl quite a few times untill it is all removed.
    Of course the cleaning agent has to have alchohol in it or it wont remove the resulting chemical sludge.
    S
    That is interesting. Never head of the Lencoclean.

    The formula I use is just commonsense to me, but I wouldnt be surprised if someone has patented it.

    My way of playing a record wet is to use a hairspray bottle to apply just a thin film. Just distilled water, as I'm not trying to clean the record, but I've found in some cases it is a great way to get stubborn dirt of a stylus.

    I don't do it often, and haven't observed any effects on the vinyl. Still curious as to the science/reasoning behind the claim that once played wet you must always play it wet.???

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    This is because the liquid emulsifies the ingrained dust in the groove. When it has dried out it has the consistency of concrete, and as a result the "surface" noise becomes even more noticeable. But if played wet again, the noise floor drops.
    Simple is it not!
    S

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    But surely if you wash all the dirt off then it's not there to be a problem?
    I just happen to think your opinion is a general sweeping statement of wrongness

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