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Thread: Scam?

  1. #1
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    Default Scam?

    I have an old G5 Mac which does everything I need it to do but it's not supported anymore. Anyhow I was browsing through some of my pics on servimg, the picture hosting site I use and a warning came up on the screen telling me my mac could be infected etc and I needed to install Mackeeper to sort out the problem. I'm sure it's one of those hoaxes to get you to buy their product. I shut the G5 down straight away and disconnected it from the router then I booted it back up and cleared the screen. The dilemma is that I don't want to reconnect it to the internet but I need to run some sort of program to find out if there's a problem. Alternatively I can just leave it and carry on using my ipad until I can afford to replace it with something more up to date. Suggestions please gents.
    Si.

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    I get it all the time and ignore it but you could look for an anti-virus application for that platform, just to be sure your mac is ok. Look at 'About This Mac' in the top left hand corner to see what version of OS X it's running.

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    It's running 10.4 Gary but because it uses the old power processor it isn't supported any more. Am I right in saying that if it was supported Apple would send an alert if the computer was compromised?
    Si.

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    No Si, Apple have never done that. They sell you a product and then other products are available for it but they don't keep tabs on what you're doing on it. I hope not anyway (maybe in North Korea they do). I would ignore the Mackeeper intrusions, it's just another company trying to scare you into buying their product. Have a look at the browser preferences, in the Security section. You can block pop up windows.

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    I purchased webroot. It works very well. I think it's available for the Mac as well as PC.

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    It is a pita not being able to run certain things. I'm now getting YouTube refusing to run but not every time I launch it. I can't connect my newer Samsung phone because the Android File Transfer for Mac won't install although the notes say it should. I wanted to use dropbox but that won't install below OS 10.6.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie spaghetti View Post
    I purchased webroot. It works very well. I think it's available for the Mac as well as PC.
    Anything you can buy now will not run on the older PPC macs. The architecture will not run it. To get around some problems you can install TenFourFox - a version of Firefox that is provided by people who care about the older macs.

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    'MacKeeper' is a scam.

    The only software I would recommend for a Mac is Little Snitch and Onyx, the former is an application-based firewall, if anything on your computer tries to connect to the network it'll block it unless you grant permission (you can then add in a rule) and the latter will check your system for glitches. All the other stuff and software that you have to pay for is unnecessary.

    Viruses and 'infections' are the scourge of PC's running Windows. There are Trojans and rootkits etc for MacOS but they're not viruses in the strictest sense.

    There was always the mantra that as about 10% of computers are Macs then it wasn't worth the time of a virus maker to bother trying to infect one, this really isn't true when you factor that Apple is a much bigger company than Microsoft now and when you factor in their iOS devices that run a version of the MacOS kernel there's plenty of kudos to be had if someone did it. Furthermore as the OS is what's called 'Unix-Like' as it operates in the same way (was originally based on BSD before branching out on its own) then if you could design a virus that would infect OSX then the chances are you could knobble Linux and BSD, AS400 and whatnot in the same way thus putting most of the Internet at risk also (most Internet servers run one of these). So the risk is real.

    Rootkits are more interesting, basically a baddy can embed a script onto their website, if you visit it and your browser runs a script (Javascript is particularly bad for this) then there's a well publicised backdoor script that will give a remote person root access to your computer, they can then install what ever they like and run what ever they want. Most of today's internet traffic is made up from 'botnets' these are 1000's of computers over the globe that are remote controlled by hackers to run attacks against sites or organisations. When you hear of 'Anonymous' taking down a site through a 'DDoS' then this is how they're able to do it, they tell all the computers under their control to bombard a single site all at once to over load it. 99% of the time the owner of the computer that's doing the attack is blissfully unaware of what's going on, they might think that their computer is simply running slow and nothing more. And these will run whether you're running a PPC or Intel CPU in your machine.

    The latest Root kit was only patched in the current version of the OS 10.10.3, all earlier versions are vulnerable (as they're free Apple expect you to upgrade to the latest version) http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/04...root_backdoor/

    Personally unless I had a particular reason to keep a PPC Mac I'd be sticking it on eBay, even though they're nice machines they are very old now and not really safe or compatible with much of the world now. You could buy something like a 5 year old Mac Mini for very little now (offset by the sale of your current machine) which would run rings around your G5 and allow you to run the current version.

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    Thanks qube, your last paragraph pretty much says what I've been thinking for a while. My requirements are pretty basic and the G5 has done everything I needed it to do but it won't connect to my iPhone or my sat nav (10.7 min reqd) so I suppose that's reason enough to upgrade. Oh and a PPC Mac can't access iTunes either. I've thought about it for a while but it'll have to wait until I get back to work as my finances are at rock bottom right now.
    Si.

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    What model is your G5? I used to have a 2x dual-core 'cheesegrater' model. Was a lovely solid machine, got a pretty penny for it on eBay so you might do well.

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    I think mine is similar. Liquid cooled too. The casing is buckled on mine which seems to happen when they're not transported in the original box and get dropped I have the original discs too.
    Si.

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    2.5GHz if I recall correctly, had 8GB of RAM and 4x 500GB drives. Water cooled as well (although they were prone to leak). I used it in my studio but it was a bit noisy. Ran 10.4 on it originally and moved up to 10.6 when it became available. Was very reliable, but when Apple sacked off PPC for being too slow it was the end of the line, switching to Intel brought a lot of new software with it, still have a soft spot for it.



    Swapped it for an 8core Xeon model which physically looked identical, now run a new hex core Mac Pro which is mega quick and look slick but I prefer the old cheese grater case!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chops54 View Post
    I think mine is similar. Liquid cooled too. The casing is buckled on mine which seems to happen when they're not transported in the original box and get dropped I have the original discs too.
    Surprised a Lancashire engineer yourself hasn't set about it with a blow torch and a mash hammer

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    I'm one of those who believes in don't mend what ain't broke Paul. Ok it didn't look good but the damaged case didn't affect the way it worked so I just shoved it under the workbench
    Si.

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    Talking of scams, who's all voting tomorrow (as my dad would say)?

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    My 2pees worth. MacKeeper is around and about the web often. It just recognises you're Mac and advertises itself by suggesting you could have malware or a virus'

    I didn't realise we had a communist party
    The only way round is through the bend...

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    Yes I thought that Warren but two pop ups came up on my screen one on top of the other and froze the screen. I couldn't get anything to work and when I knocked off the computer and rebooted it the screen came up just the same. Eventually I knocked the computer off and disconnected it from the router. When I started it up again I was able to clear everything. I've had it up and running connected to the net since and it's been fine but the thing freezing gave me the jitters at the time. I'm not very computer savvy tbh.
    Si.

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    Just make sure you don't have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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    What's the score with the JavaScript qube?
    Si.

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    JavaScript enables sites to run code via a website, it's notoriously insecure as hackers are always finding ways to exploit it, the latest one I've seen is this:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/04..._of_net_users/

    So whilst if you're running a current OS and browser and everything is patched up to date then you're generally OK (until the next thing comes along) but if you're running an old computer with old software then I would ensure JS is disabled as it would add some protection.

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